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High-Strength Minoxidil: Ultimate Guide – 48 Week Results!

Does high strength minoxidil increase the rate of hair regrowth and by how much? Or will it just increase your chances of negative side-effects without being anymore effective? In this article, you’ll find the answers to those questions and more!

When beginning a hair loss treatment, it’s common to be impatient with results. In fact, many users of 2% of 5% minoxidil are so impatient that they switch to higher doses without much thought.

However, such an action is not recommended for a number of reasons. Not only will the use of high-strength minoxidil increase your risk of side effects, but it can also backfire when you’re ready to cease use or go down to a lower-dose formula.

In this post, I’ll discuss how minoxidil works to fight balding. I’ll also compare the two most common strengths (2% and 5%), and explain why a higher dose of minoxidil does not always mean improved results.

In the end, I’ll also share with you my number one method for natural hair loss treatment.

What is Minoxidil?

Minoxidil is a drug – originally used in the treatment of high blood pressure – that acts as the active ingredient in popular hair loss treatment Rogaine.

The exact mechanism through which minoxidil works in the treatment of alopecia is debated. However, the most popular belief is that minoxidil works effectively by improving circulation to the hair follicles.

(Have your hair follicles been damaged by inflammation? Learn how to reverse the damage and revive your follicles here.)

In men and women with Androgenetic Alopecia (AGA), hair thinning and balding occurs as a result of sensitivity to DHT.

As DHT attaches to the follicles, the follicle experiences inflammation. Eventually, this results in hair miniaturization which causes thinning and, if left untreated, permanent baldness.

As hair miniaturization occurs, blood flow to the follicle decreases.

While minoxidil doesn’t inhibit the production of DHT or remove it from the scalp, it does make it possible for your hair follicles to thrive in a hostile environment. This is because as hair miniaturization occurs, the blood flow to the follicles decreases.

With minoxidil, blood flow can be reestablished, and the delivery of oxygen and vital nutrients and continue.

What Is the Recommended Minoxidil Strength?

For use as a hair loss treatment, two different strengths of minoxidil were approved by the FDA: 2% and 5%.

These strengths are available in both the liquid and foam formulations, though women are recommended to only use 2% liquid (however, they can use 5% foam).

(Liquid vs. foam – Which minoxidil formulation should you choose?)

But what’s the difference between these two strengths?

According to a 2002 study performed by Olsen et al., quite a bit.

Of course, both strengths work to increase hair count and improve scalp coverage. As expected, however, the 5% strength performed better on both counts when compared to 2% minoxidil:

The results of a study on 5% minoxidil vs 2% minoxidil
Source.

So, why would a user choose 2% over 5% if the latter is proven to work more effectively?

As strength of minoxidil increases, so too does the risk of side effects. For men who are sensitive to such things, then, the use of a lower-dose hair loss treatment can still provide positive results without (or with less) ill effects.

Find out about one popular brand of minoxidil called Kirkland here.

Is the Use of High-Strength Minoxidil Recommended?

While only 2% and 5% minoxidil are FDA approved for use in the treatment of hair loss, some users have ventured onto higher strength formulations.

It can cause itchiness on the scalp
Increased concentrations of minoxidil will also increase your chances of side effects such as itchy and dry scalp without necessarily increasing the effectiveness.

And, while many have seen positive hair growth results, is the use of increased concentration minoxidil recommended? No.

Where to Buy Higher Strength Minoxidil

While you can’t buy minoxidil that’s higher in strength than 5% over-the-counter, you may be able to get a prescription from your physician.

Of course, this will depend on the strength you’re looking for, and how familiar your physician is with minoxidil as a hair loss treatment.

In your search, you may also stumble upon online pharmacies and stores which claim to sell 10%+ minoxidil over the internet.

I strongly recommend you steer clear of such sites, as the products aren’t regulated. Simply put, you’re paying for a product that may or may not be minoxidil, and it may or may not be the strength you want.

What If the Results of Regular Strength Minoxidil Aren’t Enough?

If 2% (for women) or 5% (for men) isn’t providing the results you’re looking for, what can you do?

First, it’s important to remember that results vary for everyone. It’s easy to look at the results of minoxidil users online and think those results will be yours, too.

However, the results you see will depend upon a number of factors, including how much hair loss you’ve experienced and how long you’ve been undergoing treatment.

Second, there are treatments other than Rogaine (minoxidil) and Propecia (finasteride). The treatments I’m talking about are all natural, but their results rival those produced by both popular over-the-counter treatments.

Even better, they do more than treat the hair loss; they also treat the cause.

An All-Natural Alternative to Minoxidil

There are two ways in which you can address your hair fall: externally (through the use of topicals) and internally (through the use of supplements).

While both methods serve their purpose, the one I recommend again and again is internal. This is because I believe hair loss is a sign of your inner health and balance. Let me explain….

The modern Western diet – the diet that millions of people eat every day – is full of inflammation-causing foods and beverages. These include red meat, dairy, alcohol, and sugary grains.

Not only do these foods cause inflammation, but they also create an acidic environment within the body. Naturally, humans run on the alkaline side of the pH scale.

However, acidic foods lead to an acidic bloodstream, and this can trigger hair loss and other health issues. Actually 5-alpha-reductase (the enzyme which triggers the production of DHT) thrives in such an environment.

So, what can you do?

The simple answer is to alkalise your diet.

Alkaline foods – such as spinach, kale, almonds, coconut, and alfalfa – are easy to incorporate into your diet. Of course, I also recommend you cut way back on your intake of acidic foods (or remove them from your diet altogether).

You can add alkaline foods to your meals, or incorporate them into your day in the form of juices, smoothies, and supplements.

You don’t have to make the transition all at once, but you should strive to improve your intake of alkaline foods on a regular basis.

Not only will this provide your hair with a healthier environment, but it can also improve your overall health and feelings of well being.

Conclusion

When you don’t see the hair growth results you’d like, it’s common to consider a higher-dose method. This is true, even for minoxidil users. However, it’s not a route I would encourage you to take.

Minoxidil – whether in its FDA-approved percentage or a higher dosage – doesn’t treat the cause of your hair loss; instead, all it does is mask the symptoms. This is why I urge my readers to give the natural method outlined above a try.

I’ve had success with such an intervention, and it’s possible for you as well.

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